4 Key Differences Between Commercial And Residential HVAC Systems

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Commercial HVAC SystemMany HVAC contractors specialize in either residential or commercial systems. While these systems have many underlying similarities, the differences are significant enough that competence with one type of system does not guarantee understanding with the other.

This comparison of residential and commercial HVAC systems should help you to understand the importance of finding a contractor whose knowledge and experience matches your system and your needs.

4 Differences Between Commercial And Residential HVAC Systems

Learn 4 important differences between commercial and residential heating and cooling systems now.

1. Commercial Systems Are More Powerful

Commercial spaces are frequently much larger than residential spaces, and often serve a much greater number of people. Commercial HVAC units must be expertly sized to account for employees and customers during peak hours, and proper sizing requires a contractor with specialized technical skill and experience.

Residential units are generally smaller and vary less in terms of heating and cooling capacity. However, correctly sizing residential systems also requires knowledge and experience. In fact, correct residential sizing may be even more important because a unit that is too small won’t effectively keep you comfortable as it will be trying to constantly run to keep up with the thermostat’s settings. Whereas a unit too large will cycle on and off too quickly (short cycle) and won’t properly remove uncomfortable humidity from inside of your home. These issues can also cause additional wear on a system and shorten its life cycle.

2. Different Locations

The size of commercial heating and cooling systems is one of the reasons that these systems are almost always housed on the roofs of commercial buildings. While residential units typically sit next to or behind a home, this arrangement is impractical for commercial buildings. By placing their HVAC systems on the roof, businesses not only take advantage of unused space but also protect their systems from vandalism. Furthermore, a rooftop location makes it easy for HVAC technicians to conduct system maintenance without disrupting business operations.

3. Commercial Units Are Packaged, Residential Units Are Split

Residential HVAC systems usually consist of two units: an indoor evaporator and an outdoor compressor. In contrast, most commercial systems combine both heating and cooling into a single rooftop unit. Although these packaged commercial units are easy to access, they are complex to repair and to maintain relative to residential units. Commercial systems are also more likely to use multiple thermostats to manage temperatures in different zones of a building.

4. Residential Systems Are Standalone, Commercial Systems Are Modular

The size of commercial system is flexible—these units come in modules that can be added or taken away in order to increase or reduce cooling and heating capacity. These modular systems can be very convenient, allowing business to accommodate changing heating and cooling needs as their operations expand or contract. However, the use of modules creates an architecture for commercial HVAC systems that is quite different from the structure of residential systems. Without experience installing and maintaining these larger, modular units, technicians are likely to run into serious difficulties.

Residential Unit-Professional HVAC Contractors

Quality HVAC Services In Chandler

Bruce’s Air Conditioning and Heating can professionally install, service and repair both residential and commercial HVAC systems. We offer 100% guaranteed satisfaction, 24/7 emergency services and NATE certified technicians. If you would like to learn more about our quality heating and cooling services, or set up an appointment with one of our experienced and licensed technicians, please give us a call today!

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